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« A Passionate Call for Church Victory Gardens | Main | Redworms in the House! »

March 18, 2009

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Bronwen

hi - I'm in favour of not having any form of test or proof of need... one of the things I love about gardens is the profligacy of it all - we plant: some never germinates, and some grows, but gets weeded out, some dies, some gets blown away and eventually, still, we end up with far more than we could ever eat... God is a God of abundance who offers freely to all - so how about a garden that is open to all without restrictions or tests? Also, there are different kinds of "need" - who's to say that the person living in a "nice" house with a decent income doesn't need the companionship/contact that a garden might bring as much as someone who is desperate for the actual good?
have you read Sara Miles' book Take This Bread? http://saramiles.net/take_this_bread ?
besh wishes - may your garden grow beyond expectations!
Bronwen (in Adelaide, Australia)

Steveffeo

I would suggest using the Mittleider method of gardening, it is great for high yields, I use it personally and had great success. Cant wait to get the garden started this year.

Questions: 1. I would have the soil beds 18 inches wide 30 feet long and 3.5 feet between each bed.

We would be happy to send the Pastor a free copy of The Six steps to successful gardening, which is based on the Mittleider method.
http://www.howtoorganicgarden.com/six_steps.htm
Just add me or email

@ChangetheWorldU (Twitter)

Question 2 That is a tough one I personally would suggest no test and give openly to people who are residents.

Question 3. Buy a good full sized shovel and also a smaller trowling shovel (6-8 inches wide and pointed) that a a good 12 inch metal rake.

Question 4. I would use a combination of things, Do the allotments for about 50% of the garden, use 10% to pay volunteers for weeding and watering (unless you automate the watering)
the other 40% you can give outright to people in need.
Hope this helps

Don

The bigger question is whether the new Food Safety Administration will even put up with church gardens.

[click my name for a link to the post]

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